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Information About Quitting Smoking for the Elderly

Does your elderly loved one smoke? Are you looking into helping them to quit smoking? There are many resources and even some medications that may help them to quit smoking. However, it is first helpful to learn about the timeline after they quit smoking, so you know what to expect. From there, you can help them to quit smoking.

 

Elder Care in Marietta GA: Quitting Smoking for the Elderly

Elder Care in Marietta GA: Quitting Smoking for the Elderly

 

20 Minutes After the Last Cigarette
One of the most important things that happen when your loved one quits smoking is that their blood pressure and heart rate will drop back toward normal limits within 20 minutes after they have had their last cigarette.

 

12 Hours After the Last Cigarette
Another very beneficial thing that happens within 12 hours after they have had their last cigarette is that carbon monoxide levels in your loved one’s blood will go back to normal limits.

 

2 Weeks – 3 Months After the Last Cigarette
If your loved one can stop smoking for between 2 weeks and 3 months, they will start experiencing some major lung functioning improvements. They will be able to start breathing better and will probably be coughing less, as well. Their blood circulation will get better, too.

 

1 Month – 9 Months After the Last Cigarette
Between 1 and 9 months after the last cigarette, your loved one will have less shortness of breath. They will be able to move around more without breathing heavily. The lungs are able to handle exercise better and there will be a reduced risk of infection during this time frame.

 

1 Year After the Last Cigarette
If your loved one makes it to 1 year of quitting cigarette smoking, the risk they have for coronary heart disease will be cut in half. They also have a much lower risk of experiencing a heart attack.

 

2 Years After the Last Cigarette
The risk of cervical cancer will decrease to the same levels of a non-smoker 2 years after the last cigarette was smoked.

 

5 Years After the Last Cigarette
If your loved one stops smoking for 5 years, their risk of getting bladder, esophagus, throat, or mouth cancer is decreased by nearly half.

 

10 Years After the Last Cigarette
The risk of passing away from lung cancer decreases in half if someone stops smoking for 10 years. The risk of pancreatic and larynx cancer lowers, too.

 

15 Years After the Last Cigarette
If someone makes it to 15 years without a cigarette, they will have a reduced risk of coronary disease than a non-smoker has.

 

This information gives you an idea of what benefits your elderly loved one will have if they quit smoking. You can present this information to them. If they need some more support to quit smoking, they can talk to their doctor or you can hire an elderly care provider to assist them, as well.

 

If you or an aging loved-one are considering hiring Elder Care in Marietta, GA, please call the caring staff at Always Care Nursing Service today.
Call for Assistance: (404) 266-8773 or (800) 989-7828

Source:
Cdc.gov/data_statistics
Cdc.gov/tobacco/quit

 

Howard Gruensfelder, VP / Administrator

VP/Administrator at Always Care Nursing Services
Howard H. J. Gruensfelder - B.S.M.[Bachelor of Science in Management GA-TechGA.]

Administrator of 3 Florida (Always Care) Home Health Agencies for over Fourteen years.

Always Care of Georgia since 2001

Served as a 1st Lt. In the US Army

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